Research task for Wilfred Owen’s poetry

World_War_OneYou need to use the link below to research key aspects of World War One.  This will give you vital context for understanding the poetry of Wilfred Owen that we will be studying in the next couple of weeks.

Use this interactive link to research World War One and its impact.  You need to do the following:

a. Watch chapter 1 (Volunteering and recruitment).  Ensure that you explore the links at the end as well (diary entries / poetry etc.).  Write down 5 things you have learnt from this section in your books.

b. Watch chapter 3 (Life in the Trenches).  As above, make sure you explore the links at the end too.  Write down 10 things you have learnt from this section in your books.

Due Friday 11th September

Unit 3: Accent and Dialect

 

Go onto this section of the British Library website and browse the different tabs and videos.

Find recordings  from the part of the country I have allocated you below.   On the British Library site, you just use the map, but the recordings are also colour coded as old, modern, RP and minority ethnic.  Some already have commentaries to help you analyse their use of language.

1. Listen to at least 3 recordings and make notes containing the following:

  • A list of any words or phrases that you don’t use in your own dialect
  • An analysis of any grammatical variations from standard English (e.g. ‘I done that’ instead of ‘I did that’)

 This is all due by 14 July 2014

2. Find an example of accent and dialect as represented in Literature – i.e a novel, play or poem in which the writing shows a specific dialect.  Photocopy a page or two (no more) of this and bring it to the lesson on 14.07.14.  Please note the name of the text and the writer.

Regions for part 1 are as follows:

  • London:  Amber
  • Scotland :  Lucy
  • Wales:  Megan
  • Northern Ireland:  Tomilola
  • North-East England (e.g. Newcastle):  Ali
  • North-West England (e.g. Liverpool, Manchester):  Nick
  • Yorkshire:  Roisin
  • South West England (e.g. Devon, Cornwall):  Elliza
  • Midlands:  Stevie
  • East Anglia (including Essex):  Elettra
  • Sorcha:  You may choose which one you want to do ( a reward for all your hard work).

Language Change

You have been studying lexical change over time and have done some reading on how English has changed, specifically since 1066.  Have a look at these resources and add a comment on 5 things you have learnt from browsing each of these areas.  TAKE NOTE:  Focus only on the era you have been assigned in class.

http://www.bl.uk/learning/langlit/evolvingenglish/accessvers/index.html

http://www.bl.uk/learning/langlit/booksforcooks/booksforcooks.html

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/interactive/timelines/language_timeline/index_embed.shtml

 

Analysing text types for Unit 4 coursework

Please complete one more of these sheets for a genre of your choice (in addition to the one you did in class this week).  If doing fiction, ensure you include a sub-genre.  Make sure that these are genres you are considering for your coursework.  I would also like you to complete one for Rossetti’s poetry as a whole.  So you will hand in 3 of these sheets in total – two for genres of your choice; one for Rosetti’s poetry.

Remember that, as you should have done when you looked at fairy tales and women’s magazines, you should try to look at more than one example of each text type, in case the features you identify are isolated and unique to that particular text, rather than features of a text type in general.  Try to find at least 2 examples before completing the sheet.

Due: Monday 24th September

The sheet is available to download here:

Analysing text types and genres

Critical views of Jane Eyre and WSS

Following our lesson on critical perspectives and contexts of production and reception, you are going to read some reviews of Jane Eyre and Wide Sargasso Sea.  Many of the reviews of Jane Eyre are contemporary (i.e. of the time that the text was written).  The later reviews, including both that mention Wide Sargasso Sea, are more modern reviews.

You need to read the review you have been allocated below and then post a comment that covers:

  • Whether the critic is broadly positive or negative about the novel (for the 1847/1848 reviews only)
  • The critic’s view of the novel
  • Which of the critical positions the critic seems to be writing from and why (give evidence)
  • Whether or not you agree with the views and/or interpretation expressed by the critic and why

This is all due before the lesson on Monday 19th January

Text allocations as follows:

Critic [London] (Oct 1847) – Rochelle

Graham’s Magazine (May 1848) – Tasnia

Harbinger [New York] (April 1848) – Yasmin

Spectator [London] (1847) – Polina

Tait’s Edinburg Magazine (May 1848) – Erim

Quarterly Review 1848 – Nii Noi

North American Review 1848 – Lulu

Living Age 1848 – Sian

Fraser’s magazine 1847 – Jeanette

VictorianWeb article (modern perspective on contemporary critics) – Matt

Emag – A critical discussion – Christina

Is Jane Eyre a subversive novel – Ismail

JE and WSS – Other Voices – Miriam

JE and WSS – Some connections – Manita

The outrageous Ms Bronte – Shannen

You also all need to complete the following activity, reading each critical extract and then looking at the annotations and the critical position taken by the writer:

EMC critical responses over time

‘Translations’ research

This research work is due before the lesson on Thursday 10th November.  Research the following topics and:

  1. Use relevant sites (note plural – NOT just Wikipedia!) to take notes in your books under each heading. 
  2. Post a comment below, giving your 3 most interesting points on each topic.  You need to make sure your points are different to the ones that are posted before you!

The play ‘Translations’ is set in 1833, in County Donegal, Ireland.

The political situation in Ireland at the time.  Look at:

  • whether Ireland was independent
  • how it was governed
  • The Act of Union
  • Land ownership
  • The Republican movement

Education in Ireland at the time, particularly:

  • Hedge schools – what they were, how they were run etc
  • The alternative to hedge schools
  • Contemporary views of each type of school

Donegal life at the time:

  • What type of area this is / was
  • How people lived and worked
  • emigration
  • poverty and famine

The Gaelic language:

  • Who spoke this then?
  • Who speaks it now?
  • What else was spoken in Ireland at the time?
  • What was Ireland’s ‘official’ language at the time?

Analysing text types for Unit 4 coursework

Following the lesson where we analysed the fairy tale genre as a class, you need to do this for one fiction genre (e.g. romantic novel, detective novel) and one non-fiction genre (e.g. travelogue, obituary) of your choice.  Make sure that these are genres you are considering for your coursework.  I would also like you to complete one for Rossetti’s poetry as a whole.  So that’s 3 of these sheets in total.

Remember that, as we did in the lesson, you should try to look at more than one example of each text type, in case the features you identify are isolated and unique to that particular text, rather than features of a text type in general.  Try to find at least 2 examples before completing the sheet.

The sheet is available to download here:

 Analysing text types and genres